Buildings of Note Criteria

Criteria Description
Rarity Not many examples locally. This can include unusual assets such as cast-iron bridges and traditional signage or more common ones of unusual architectural style or materials.
Representativeness May be representative of a particular architectural period, architect, movement, company or group of its time, for example Quaker, railway, Victorian and industrial.
Architectural

interest

Of importance in its architectural design, decoration or craftsmanship; important examples of particular building types, materials and techniques (e.g. buildings displaying technological innovation) and significant plan forms.
Townscape or Landscape value Key landmark buildings or structures and buildings that strongly contribute to a view or roofscape vista. Valued open spaces, (including designed landscapes, streets, squares, parks, gardens, amenity and green spaces), walls, fences, railings, street surfaces (including cobbles, setts and grass verges). Street furniture (including signposts, streetlights, benches, post boxes and telephone boxes).
Group value Groupings of assets with a clear visual, design or historic relationship (including farmyards, terraces, group form and layout), contribution to street scene, roofscapes and perception.
Artistic interest An asset with artistic interest exhibiting some degree of creative skill (including sculpture, painting, decoration, advertisements, memorials, gates, railings, door surrounds, finials and signage).
Historic association Associated with an historical person or event of acknowledged note (including important local figures or events, for example landowner, commemorative event, charity, ecclesiastical or other community group and former resident). Highly unlikely this would apply to assets associated with a living person.
Archaeological

interest

There may be evidence to suggest that a site is of significant archaeological interest.